Do You Tunisian Crochet?

Have you tried Tunisian crochet before? If you haven’t ever heard of this technique, it’s a special combination of knit and crochet that uses what was traditionally called an “afghan” hook, or a long crochet hook. Your grandma would have known it as “Afghan stitch” or “Afghan crochet” because it was a very popular technique to use to make large panels for blankets. In fact, I know my grandma knew how to do Afghan stitch, because she made my dad an entire blanket using this technique.

I learned how to do Tunisian crochet about 15 years ago before I had learned to knit. I had been crocheting for several years and wanted to branch out to something new, but wasn’t ready to pick up some knitting needles. I had several books, a few long afghan hooks, and a few double-ended crochet cables (like circular knitting needles but with crochet hook tips). I mostly made scarves, because you don’t have to turn your work with Tunisian crochet. The above pictured scarf is the only thing I still have from when I first learned Tunisian. Unfortunately I gave away all my Tunisian supplies when I learned to knit, thinking I would never be interested in doing it again. I have major regrets now for not keeping my supplies, especially the double-ended cable hooks.

Now with the recent resurgence of this technique, I decided to get a new set of Tunisian hooks and pick it up again. And I’m addicted! I really think the best part about Tunisian crochet is the fact you don’t have to turn your work. Tunisian is a combo of “croknitting” loops onto your hook going right to left, then crocheting the loops off your hook from left to right. It produces a fabric that is neither fully knit nor fully crochet but resembles a little bit of both. I’m currently working on my very first Tunisian crochet blanket, and it’s been fun learning new stitches.

If you would like to give Tunisian crochet a try, check out these supplies on Amazon here:

You can also read more detailed information about Tunisian crochet and the basic stitches in this article here. I’m hoping to create some Tunisian crochet designs in the future, and I can’t wait to learn new techniques and stitches! Feel free to leave a comment if you have questions about Tunisian crochet or if you’ve tried it before!

Please note this post contains Amazon affiliate links. This means I receive a small commission when you purchase through the links at no additional cost to you. All pictures and opinions contained in this post are my own.

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